Beggars and Prostitutes

 

 

mendThe Sisters began their life together caring for the sick in their own homes, and later, began to take in prostitutes.  It was their work with these “lost women” that moved the Sisters into a state of rejection by the townspeople.  Despite the loss of financial support, Mother Frances was committed to heal spiritual ills as well as physical ones, and continued to live and work frugally, sharing all things in common with the women.

God alone intervened when the Good Shepherd Sisters moved into town and took over the ministry with the prostitutes.
In light of the coming cholera epidemic spreading through Europe, the Sisters spent the next few months caring for the sick in the hospital, with the Sisters living in the same building. 

All concern for their own safety and health was put aside, as the Sisters worked tirelessly to relieve the sufferings of others.

For Silent Reflection and Journaling:

What do you think drew other women to join the Sisters in their work and life despite the lack of popularity with benefactors?

Where is your heart when reading about the Sisters’ early work with the sick and prostitutes?

What attracted you to join the Franciscan Sisters of the Poor?