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12'The Raising of Lazarus' by Vincent van Gogh

When I first read the Chapter theme of “Set free the healing energy of Christ,” a sense of peace filled me. The theme resonated with me on many levels. The Gospel story of Lazarus came to me in prayer. In this story we find Lazarus dead.  The bystanders see and hear Jesus calling Lazarus out of his tomb. They help roll the stone away from the tomb and remove the cloth that has been wrapped around the body of Lazarus. They are involved.

Today we are the bystanders and are invited to set free the healing energy of Christ. In our present day society, issues of the unemployed, undocumented, unborn, uninsured, unfed, unprotected, unwanted and unhealthy fill our TV screens every day.  Our various societies are extremely stressed. Technological advances are creating a generation of un-connected young adults.

At the tomb of Lazarus, Jesus wept. Jesus wept because God is not distant and unconcerned about our daily lives. In Christ, God has entered our human condition and knows our brokenness.

 

 

When we weep and anguish over the various sufferings of our sisters and brothers, we are obligated to respond and get involved to the degree that our time and talents allow. Our encounters with others are opportunities to set free the healing energy of Christ. Healing occurs through our intentional presence. It is the present moment that counts…not yesterday nor tomorrow but right now. We make a difference one day at a time, one choice at a time, one encounter at a time.

Our current Chapter theme of “Set free the healing energy of Christ,” and our previous theme of  “Generate compassion and hope in the community of life” feel so natural to us that it is hard to realize how prophetic they are. We are God’s instruments and we trust God’s work within and through us.  We may not always see how the “dots connect” yet if we are faithful to taking the steps, we can see each and every day we can be confident that God will bring to completion the work begun in us as an individual and as a Congregation.

Sr. June Casterton, sfp